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New thyroid study

Posted on July 31, 2016

Sydney Paediatric Endocrinologist, Associate Professor Michelle Jack is a co-author on an article published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology on the 21st July, 2016. 

The research paper is titled: Association between borderline neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations and educational and developmental outcomes: a population-based-record-linkage study. 

The researchers linked data from newborn screening tests on more than 500,000 infants collected between 1994 and 2008 to later assessments of childhood development and school performance. This is the largest study of it's kind worldwide. The study found that children with results on the newborn screening test that were just below the current thresholds that trigger a recall for further investigation of thyroid function, had an increased likelihood of poor neurodevelopmental outcomes at school age. They had lower scores on Naplan testing for numeracy and reading performance and were more likely to be classified as having 'special needs' on developmental assessment. The study suggested the need for further research into the reasons for this association. 

Link to the article: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-8587(16)30122-X/abstract

Link to SMH Article: http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/babies-with-poor-thyroid-function-missed-at-birth-do-worse-on-naplan-test-in-primary-school-nsw-study-20160729-gqgjpm.html

Also featured on the University of Sydney news page: http://sydney.edu.au/news-opinion/news/2016/07/28/abnormal-thyroid-function-in-newborns-linked-to-poor-reading-and.html